on paper

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Have you seen this tutorial/blog post over at Sublime Stitching? If you haven’t I suggest you click over, read it and then come back.

I’ll wait.

Mind blown? Mine was. Actually, I was a little peeved that I hadn’t thought of it first! It couldn’t be simpler. On fabric, I have no problems with chain stitching in “the standard way”, but on paper? That’s another story. It’s tricky to keep the tension correct, and there’s always the worry that I’m pulling too hard and will rip things. But this other top-down method is no harder on the paper than the standard backstitch and that makes me both worry less and results in (what I think are) cleaner stitches. Though you might not be able to tell from this photo. The top-down method is on the left, the standard on the right. Plus it takes only half the time to work a line of stitches. In the future, this is how I’ll be working the chain stitch in my paper pieces!

top-down method on the left, regular on the right

top-down method on the left, regular on the right

dickinson and thread
Here’s the piece I made for myself the other day, not even realizing it was Emily Dickinson’s birthday when I completed it. A nice coincidence.

Back in my college days, I took a seminar on her poetry and have been smitten with this particular verse since then. I’m quite happy with the end result. I particularly love the way the typewriter made little ghost “t’s” — likely because I was thumping so hard on the keys.

I’ve been on a bit of a making/creating tear lately. There will be more to share in the upcoming weeks.

In addition to the swap piece that I’m working on, I’m also making a little something just for me.

It’s nice to make something just because. Working a stem stitch on this vintage paper is just really satisfying — as was hammering away on the typewriter (once I remembered which one was working the best).

congruent
Congruency: Variations on the Utility Graph.

This piece started out slightly different (as seen here) back when I gave a tiny peek into what I had cooking in my brain. I was just playing around with different configurations of my favorite and old friend, K 3,3. I realized though that I would be happier if the graphs were exactly equal — that is if there were four graphs on each page. And so, I kept the two pieces on the right and modified the ones on the left. Further, I used the opening page of the Answers section for the upper left-hand piece (and the last page was used on the bottom right-hand one). But the thing that made me the most happy was the rotation I added to the bottom left-hand graph. I wanted the almost-triangles to look more different from the triangles above them.

To me, this piece is about things that appear to be quite different, but are fundamentally the same — the same number of points, the same number of lines, simply arranged in another configuration. Is this idea the answer to everything? No. But for a lot of things, this idea of being congruent can be key.

(And yes, I sort of made up the word “congruency” but I liked it better so there.)

 

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